Reading 2013: Remote

remote

Whether you already work from home, wish you could work remotely, or are just curious about those who do, Remote: Office Not Required is a great little read about a growing phenomenon that is increasing on a global scale.

Thanks to the Internet, the world is changing; and as an extension, so is the workplace and where we work. The book is written to both employers who may benefit from transitioning their workforces to remote work and to individuals who desire to work remotely, or are considering doing so. While applicable to many fields, many of the examples and resources are for those primarily involved in work that is done through the Internet and the computer. Remote work is certainly accessible and important to those in other fields, but this book deals primarily within the focus of technologically accessible employment.

My husband has worked remotely full-time for over four years now, and I have done freelance work on and off until beginning a more full-time remote contract job four months ago. Consequentially, most of this reading was not filled with novel concepts. Still, I really enjoyed the read, and found a number of new, helpful resources and ideas along the way.

Helpful Cautions: Avoiding Burnout

While many believe that allowing employees to work away from the direct supervision of the office environment will lead to laziness, the authors of Remote note that it is usually quite the opposite. Those who shift to remote work are often doing work they enjoy, and the tendency is actually that remote workers may be tempted to work too much. Even doing work you love, you need breaks and diversions. I know that in our situation, we have found this temptation to be the case, particularly as access to employment has increased. I found this caution timely and helpful.

Table of Contents:

remotea

remoteb

remotec

remoted

Comments

  1. 1

    says

    Brian works (part time) remotely, and I have done gigs here and there. I hope to eventually add more when my season is more appropriate for it. I find that “finding the work you love” is still the hard part. Just random remote jobs won’t cut it, especially as a busy mom. But I hope that when the time is right (things have settled down a bit after a new baby) that I’ll be able to find something that I love doing. We’ll see… I hope to read this at the beginning of next year to prepare for that step though.

  2. 2

    says

    I work mostly remotely, with a few client meetings here and there, and I also find it a problem to figure out when to stop working. Because I’m not bound by a 9-5 schedule, and because I enjoy what I do (writing, marketing, strategy), it’s easy for me to let work fill every space. I do love the flexibility and the fact that remote work tends to be outcome-based rather than time-in-chair based.

Trackbacks

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>